The Values that Shape Us... 

Reporting, Evaluating, and Reflecting Upon the 1997-2000 Quadrennium of the General Commission on the Status and Role of Women 

 

We value women... 

We value the full inclusion of women, especially those who are marginalized by society and by the church. 
We believe that we are called to be a prophetic voice for women, even as we work in a style that is collaborative and hospitable as we seek solutions. 
We value research about the issues that affect women, providing resources to empower women, and being an advocate for women in the church and in the society at large. 
We believe that “trust” is a key to our work on behalf of women, and we attempt to work in a style that builds trust with women, with annual conferences, and with local churches. 

We value the role of women as leaders in The United Methodist Church... 
As a Commission we advocate for the full participation of women in the life of the church, and we also provide training and networking opportunities so that new women leaders can find their place among the leadership of our denomination. 
We believe in The United Methodist Church; and while we are not naïve, we are hopeful and concerned for its future. 
We attempt to listen to the whole church and we also network with other boards and agencies with whom we share common agenda. 

We value our life together as a Commission... 

Our Commission tries to model an inclusive community by valuing the qualities of acceptance and honest sharing in a “safe” environment. 
Our life together is characterized by a variety of worship styles, caring, playfulness and friendship as we deal with sensitive issues using a consensus style which allows all to participate. 
Our members have found that being a part of this Commission has been a time of personal growth, new relationships, and immersion experiences which have been challenging and rewarding. 

We value honest evaluation of our work... 

We are concerned that we have focused at times more upon clergywomen’s issues, and we are committed to more focus upon the role of laywomen. 
We are concerned that even within our own Commission it is not easy to have full inclusion, but we are committed to continuing this effort as a model for the whole church. 
We are concerned that we, too, can be caught in the trap of institutional preservation, and we are committed to continual evaluation of our work. 
We are concerned that as our Commission seeks consensus, we sometimes allow this very consensus to compromise our voice and lose our prophetic edge. 
Our Commission pays attention to the interrelatedness of racism, sexism, classism, heterosexism, and other barriers to inclusiveness; and, we confess that we have not yet reached consensus on how to witness to the oneness of Christ we are called to embody. 

Note: the report is a composition of the values assessment completed by the member of the General Commission on the Status and Role of Women at its final meeting of the 1997-2000 Quadrennium.